Monday, 30 March 2020 00:00

There is a small bone that can be found on the outside, near the middle of the foot. This is referred to as the cuboid bone, which is attached to the heel bone by ligaments. If the tissues surrounding the cuboid bone become injured, the medical condition that is known as cuboid syndrome may develop. A common symptom that is generally associated with this condition may consist of pain and discomfort on the outside of the foot, which may then spread to the toes. The affected area may become swollen, and make it difficult to walk on uneven surfaces. Additionally, limping may become a natural method of dispersing some of the body’s weight. This condition may be caused by enduring an ankle injury, or if the patient has flat feet. Moderate relief may be found if the affected foot is elevated, as this may help to reduce a portion of the swelling. If you have these types of symptoms, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can properly treat this condition.

Cuboid syndrome, also known as cuboid subluxation, occurs when the joints and ligaments near the cuboid bone in the foot become torn. If you have cuboid syndrome, consult with Dr. Derek T. Pantiel from Summit Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Cuboid syndrome is a common cause of lateral foot pain, which is pain on the outside of the foot. The condition may happen suddenly due to an ankle sprain, or it may develop slowly overtime from repetitive tension through the bone and surrounding structures.

Causes

The most common causes of cuboid syndrome include:

  • Injury – The most common cause of this ailment is an ankle sprain.
  • Repetitive Strain – Tension placed through the peroneus longus muscle from repetitive activities such as jumping and running may cause excessive traction on the bone causing it to sublux.
  • Altered Foot Biomechanics – Most people suffering from cuboid subluxation have flat feet.

Symptoms

A common symptom of cuboid syndrome is pain along the outside of the foot which can be felt in the ankle and toes. This pain may create walking difficulties and may cause those with the condition to walk with a limp.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis of cuboid syndrome is often difficult, and it is often misdiagnosed. X-rays, MRIs and CT scans often fail to properly show the cuboid subluxation. Although there isn’t a specific test used to diagnose cuboid syndrome, your podiatrist will usually check if pain is felt while pressing firmly on the cuboid bone of your foot.

Treatment

Just as the range of causes varies widely, so do treatments. Some more common treatments are ice therapy, rest, exercise, taping, and orthotics.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Wilmington, Whiteville, and Burgaw, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 23 March 2020 00:00

Athlete’s foot is considered to be a fungal infection that is typically present in between the toes, but may spread to other parts of the body if left untreated. Most cases of athlete’s foot may be treated with the use of over-the-counter sprays or creams. However, some patients have found that they develop this condition more than once, and continuously have tried to get rid of athlete’s foot, but it continues to come back. To help avoid getting athlete’s foot, it’s suggested that you are using the appropriate footwear in public places, such as swimming pools, locker rooms, and communal showers. If you find that you are taking the proper precautionary measures, and are still getting athlete’s foot, please consult with a podiatrist who can help treat your condition, as well as give you professional tips on how to avoid it’s development in the future.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot is often an uncomfortable condition to experience. Thankfully, podiatrists specialize in treating athlete’s foot and offer the best treatment options. If you have any questions about athlete’s foot, consult with Dr. Derek T. Pantiel from Summit Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality treatment.

What Is Athlete’s Foot?

Tinea pedis, more commonly known as athlete’s foot, is a non-serious and common fungal infection of the foot. Athlete’s foot is contagious and can be contracted by touching someone who has it or infected surfaces. The most common places contaminated by it are public showers, locker rooms, and swimming pools. Once contracted, it grows on feet that are left inside moist, dark, and warm shoes and socks.

Prevention

The most effective ways to prevent athlete’s foot include:

  • Thoroughly washing and drying feet
  • Avoid going barefoot in locker rooms and public showers
  • Using shower shoes in public showers
  • Wearing socks that allow the feet to breathe
  • Changing socks and shoes frequently if you sweat a lot

Symptoms

Athlete’s foot initially occurs as a rash between the toes. However, if left undiagnosed, it can spread to the sides and bottom of the feet, toenails, and if touched by hand, the hands themselves. Symptoms include:

  • Redness
  • Burning
  • Itching
  • Scaly and peeling skin

Diagnosis and Treatment

Diagnosis is quick and easy. Skin samples will be taken and either viewed under a microscope or sent to a lab for testing. Sometimes, a podiatrist can diagnose it based on simply looking at it. Once confirmed, treatment options include oral and topical antifungal medications.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Wilmington, Whiteville, and Burgaw, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

Read more about Athlete's Foot
Tuesday, 17 March 2020 00:00

Want to wear open toe shoes again? ...Special occasion? Vacation? ...You don't need an excuse to have beautiful nails.

Monday, 16 March 2020 00:00

A corn will typically develop as a result of excessive pressure. They can emerge between the toes, or on the bottom of the feet. Corns are described as a small area of skin that has become hardened, and can often be painful and uncomfortable. This ailment may be caused by wearing shoes that do not fit correctly, or from medical conditions that can include hammertoes or bunions. Hard corns typically develop on the top of the outer three toes, and soft corns will form between the toes. Walking may also become difficult when a corn has formed. Some patients have found relief by wearing small pads over their corns, which may help to ease the friction. In addition, covering the corn and wearing shoes that leave ample room for the toes to move freely in, can also be helpful in alleviating some of the pain. If you are afflicted with a corn, it is strongly suggested that you consult with a podiatrist who can recommend proper corn removal options for you.

Corns can make walking very painful and should be treated immediately. If you have questions regarding your feet and ankles, contact Dr. Derek T. Pantiel of Summit Podiatry. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Corns: What Are They? And How Do You Get Rid of Them?
Corns are thickened areas on the skin that can become painful. They are caused by excessive pressure and friction on the skin. Corns press into the deeper layers of the skin and are usually round in shape.

Ways to Prevent Corns
There are many ways to get rid of painful corns such as:

  • Wearing properly fitting shoes that have been measured by a professional
  • Wearing shoes that are not sharply pointed or have high heels
  • Wearing only shoes that offer support

Treating Corns

Although most corns slowly disappear when the friction or pressure stops, this isn’t always the case. Consult with your podiatrist to determine the best treatment option for your case of corns.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Wilmington, Whiteville, and Burgaw, NC. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Understanding Corns and Calluses
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